Episodes

17TH Century 20TH Century Native American History

The Wampanoag & the Thanksgiving Myth

Nov. 22, 2021

In Autumn of 1621, a group of Pilgrims from the Mayflower voyage and Wampanoag men, led by their sachem Massasoit, ate a feast together. The existence of that meal, which held little importance to either the Pilgrims or the …

Guest: Kisha James
19TH Century 20TH Century Native American History

Treaty Rights of the Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe

Nov. 15, 2021

Before the arrival of Europeans, the Ojibwe nation occupied much of the Lake Superior region, including what is now Ontario in Canada and Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota in the United States. In 1850, President Zachary Ta…

20TH Century Military History Native American History World War II

Alaska Territorial Guard in World War II

Nov. 8, 2021

Prior to World War II, most of the US military deemed the territory of Alaska as militarily unimportant, to the point where the Alaska National Guard units were stationed instead in Washington state in August of 1941. That c…

Guest: Holly Guise
18TH Century 19TH Century Native American History

The Stockbridge-Munsee Community & their Removal History

Nov. 1, 2021

The Stockbridge-Munsee Community , the People of the Waters that Are Never Still, were forced to move many times after they first encountered Europeans. In 1609, Dutch trader Henry Hudson sailed up the Mahicannituck, the Riv…

19TH Century 20TH Century Women's History

Fashion, Feminism, and the New Woman of the late 19th Century

Oct. 25, 2021

The late 19th Century ushered in an evolution in women’s fashion from the Victorian “True Woman” whose femininity was displayed in wide skirts and petticoats, the “New Woman” of the late 19th and early 20th centuries was mod…

20TH Century Women's History

The Original Fight for the Equal Rights Amendment

Oct. 18, 2021

After the 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920, enfranchising (some) women, lots of questions remained. If women could vote, could they serve on juries? Could they hold public office? What about the array of state-laws that s…

19TH Century 20TH Century Biographical History Native American History Women's History

Zitkála-Šá

Oct. 11, 2021

Writer, musician, and political activist Zitkála-Šá, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was born on February 22, 1876, on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota, where she lived until she was eight. When Zitkála-…

Guest: P. Jane Hafen
20TH Century Military History Post-WW2 History Women's History

Women in the U.S. Military during the Cold War

Oct. 4, 2021

Nearly 350,000 American women served in the US military during World War II. Although the women in the military didn’t engage in combat their presence was vital to the American effort, in clerical work as well as in driving …

Guest: Tanya Roth
18TH Century 19TH Century Black History

Freedom Suits in Maryland & DC, 1790-1864

Sept. 27, 2021

Slavery was legal in Maryland until November 1, 1864, when a new state constitution prohibited the practice of slavery. Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation the year before had declared slaves in the Confederate states to be …

20TH Century Biographical History Black History Food & Drink History Post-WW2 History Women's History

Chef Lena Richard

Sept. 20, 2021

Over a decade before Julia Child’s The French Chef appeared on TV, a Black woman chef hosted her own, very popular cooking show on WDSU-TV in New Orleans. At a time when families were just beginning to own televisions, Chef …

20TH Century Black History History Of Science & Medicine LGBTQIA+ History Post-WW2 History

African American AIDS Activism

Sept. 13, 2021

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (the CDC), in 2018, 13% of the US population was Black and African American, but 42% of new HIV diagnoses in the US were from Black and African American people. Thi…

Guest: Dan Royles
20TH Century Food & Drink History Labor History Post-WW2 History

The Coors Boycott

Sept. 6, 2021

In the mid-1960s, to protest discriminatory hiring practices, Chicano groups in Colorado called for a boycott of the Coors Brewing Company, launching what would become a decades-long boycott that brought together a coalition…

19TH Century History Of Science & Medicine

Phrenology & Crime in 19th Century America

Aug. 30, 2021

In Nineteenth Century America there was a strong reformist push to know and improve the self. One key tactic Americans used to learn more about themselves was phrenological readings. They would pay practical phrenologists, l…

19TH Century

Chesapeake Bay Pirates & the 19th Century Oyster Wars

Aug. 23, 2021

In Chesapeake Bay in the late 19th century, oyster harvesting was a big business. There were so many oyster harvesters harvesting so many oysters that the legislatures of Maryland and Virginia had to start regulating who cou…

19TH Century Food & Drink History

Prohibition in the 1850s

Aug. 16, 2021

Popular depictions of prohibition in the United States usually show the speakeasies, bootleggers, flappers, and bathtub gin of the Roaring Twenties, but earlier attempts at prohibition stretch back far into the 19th century.…

Guest: Kyle Volk
19TH Century Riots

The Nativist Riots of Philadelphia in 1844

Aug. 9, 2021

In May of 1844, growing tensions between nativists and Irish Catholic immigrants in Philadelphia erupted into violence in the streets of the Irish Catholic Kensington district, prompted in part by a disagreement over whether…

19TH Century Biographical History Women's History

Elizabeth Packard

Aug. 2, 2021

Elizabeth Packard was born in Massachusetts in 1816 into a comfortable home where her parents were able to provide for her education. She taught briefly at a girls’ school before at age 23 agreeing at her parents’ urging to …

Guest: Kate Moore
20TH Century Biographical History History Of Science & Medicine

Mary Mallon (The Sad & Complicated Story of "Typhoid Mary")

July 26, 2021

Mary Mallon, known to history as Typhoid Mary, immigrated from Northern Ireland to New York City at age 15, around 1883. She found work as a cook, a well paying job for an immigrant woman and worked for number of different f…

Guest: Kari Nixon
20TH Century Immigration Latino History Post-WW2 History Riots

Migrant Incarceration and the 1985 El Centro Hunger Strike

July 19, 2021

In 1945, United States immigration officials opened the El Centro Immigration Detention Camp in El Centro, California, to be an administrative holding center for unauthorized Mexican migrants, many of whom had been working o…

Guest: Jessica Ordaz
20TH Century Black History Civil Rights Movement Post-WW2 History

Black Teachers & The Civil Rights Movement in South Carolina

July 12, 2021

On May 17, 1954, the Supreme Court decided unanimously in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka Kansas that that racial segregation of children in public schools was unconstitutional. Although the process was slow and conten…

20TH Century LGBTQIA+ History

Homosexuality and the Left Before 1960

July 5, 2021

Political activism of queer people in the United States started long before the Stonewall riots in 1969. One surprising place that queer people found a home for their activism was in the Communist Party. The Communist Party …

19TH Century 20TH Century Biographical History LGBTQIA+ History Women's History

Sophonisba Breckinridge

June 28, 2021

Sophonisba “Nisba” Preston Breckinridge, born April 1, 1866, was a woman of firsts. Breckinridge was the first woman admitted to the Kentucky bar to practice law in 1895; the first woman to earn a PhD in Political Science at…

Guest: Anya Jabour
19TH Century 20TH Century Biographical History Black History Civil War Military History Women's History

Susie King Taylor

June 21, 2021

Susie King Taylor was born into slavery in Georgia in 1848. With the help of family members, she was educated and escaped, joining the Union army at the age of 14, to serve ostensibly as a laundress, but in reality as a nurs…

Guest: Ben Railton
20TH Century Black History Civil Rights Movement Post-WW2 History Riots

The Jackson State Shootings in May 1970

June 14, 2021

Just after midnight on May 15, 1970, officers opened fire on a group of unarmed students milling in front of a dorm on the campus of Jackson State College in Jackson, Mississippi, killing two and wounding twelve. Although th…