20TH Century Episodes

20TH Century Military History Post-WW2 History Women's History

Women in the U.S. Military during the Cold War

Oct. 4, 2021

Nearly 350,000 American women served in the US military during World War II. Although the women in the military didn’t engage in combat their presence was vital to the American effort, in clerical work as well as in driving …

Guest: Tanya Roth
20TH Century Biographical History Black History Food & Drink History Post-WW2 History Women's History

Chef Lena Richard

Sept. 20, 2021

Over a decade before Julia Child’s The French Chef appeared on TV, a Black woman chef hosted her own, very popular cooking show on WDSU-TV in New Orleans. At a time when families were just beginning to own televisions, Chef …

20TH Century Black History History Of Science & Medicine LGBTQIA+ History Post-WW2 History

African American AIDS Activism

Sept. 13, 2021

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (the CDC), in 2018, 13% of the US population was Black and African American, but 42% of new HIV diagnoses in the US were from Black and African American people. Thi…

Guest: Dan Royles
20TH Century Food & Drink History Labor History Post-WW2 History

The Coors Boycott

Sept. 6, 2021

In the mid-1960s, to protest discriminatory hiring practices, Chicano groups in Colorado called for a boycott of the Coors Brewing Company, launching what would become a decades-long boycott that brought together a coalition…

20TH Century Biographical History History Of Science & Medicine

Mary Mallon (The Sad & Complicated Story of "Typhoid Mary")

July 26, 2021

Mary Mallon, known to history as Typhoid Mary, immigrated from Northern Ireland to New York City at age 15, around 1883. She found work as a cook, a well paying job for an immigrant woman and worked for number of different f…

Guest: Kari Nixon
20TH Century Immigration Latino History Post-WW2 History Riots Carceral History

Migrant Incarceration and the 1985 El Centro Hunger Strike

July 19, 2021

In 1945, United States immigration officials opened the El Centro Immigration Detention Camp in El Centro, California, to be an administrative holding center for unauthorized Mexican migrants, many of whom had been working o…

Guest: Jessica Ordaz
20TH Century Black History Civil Rights Movement Post-WW2 History

Black Teachers & The Civil Rights Movement in South Carolina

July 12, 2021

On May 17, 1954, the Supreme Court decided unanimously in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka Kansas that that racial segregation of children in public schools was unconstitutional. Although the process was slow and conten…

20TH Century LGBTQIA+ History

Homosexuality and the Left Before 1960

July 5, 2021

Political activism of queer people in the United States started long before the Stonewall riots in 1969. One surprising place that queer people found a home for their activism was in the Communist Party. The Communist Party …

19TH Century 20TH Century Biographical History LGBTQIA+ History Women's History

Sophonisba Breckinridge

June 28, 2021

Sophonisba “Nisba” Preston Breckinridge, born April 1, 1866, was a woman of firsts. Breckinridge was the first woman admitted to the Kentucky bar to practice law in 1895; the first woman to earn a PhD in Political Science at…

Guest: Anya Jabour
19TH Century 20TH Century Biographical History Black History Civil War Women's History

Susie King Taylor

June 21, 2021

Susie King Taylor was born into slavery in Georgia in 1848. With the help of family members, she was educated and escaped, joining the Union army at the age of 14, to serve ostensibly as a laundress, but in reality as a nurs…

Guest: Ben Railton
20TH Century Black History Civil Rights Movement Post-WW2 History Riots

The Jackson State Shootings in May 1970

June 14, 2021

Just after midnight on May 15, 1970, officers opened fire on a group of unarmed students milling in front of a dorm on the campus of Jackson State College in Jackson, Mississippi, killing two and wounding twelve. Although th…

20TH Century Military History Women's History World War I

Knitting Brigades of World War I

June 7, 2021

Between America’s entry into World War I and the end of the war less than two years later, Americans knit 23 million articles of clothing and bandages for soldiers overseas, directed by the American Red Cross. How was this k…

Guest: Holly Korda